Global Destinies of Latin America

Latin America has been inundated with global flows (economic, financial, criminal, migration, cultural and religious) at the same time as being propelled beyond its borders, to North America and further, on a globalised stage. At the outset of the 21st century, what does the continent contribute to theory and research into social sciences and, vice versa, how are global intellectual and scientific questions addressed in its local, regional and transnational realities?

From the 1940s to the 1970s, Latin America was a breeding ground for the social sciences. Many models (development, dependence, modernisation, centre-periphery, internal colonialist, dual society, marginal, national populist, revolutionary nationalist) were forged or implemented there before being exported and applied to the rest of the Third World, adopted by universities in developed countries and international and universalised bodies.

After the disappearance of the developmentalist and national populist model of the 20th century, after the revolutionary movements and dictatorships, after the crises, the neo-liberal wave and democratic transitions, what theories, analyses and paradigms are likely to account for the evolutions underway in the region and in its relations with the rest of the world? This subject will be addressed based on research conducted into various themes with contributions from the associated specialists: new social and cultural movements; bottom-up multiculturalism (Indian and black emergence) and top-down multiculturalism (multicultural policies); new religious trends; human rights; the rise of women; biodiversity and the environment; institutions driving economic globalisation and alter global experiences; neo-populism; the new mineral and agrifood exporting economy; post-developmentalist paradigms; post-political violence; drug trafficking; globalised music; migratory experiences; identities and subjectivities.

 

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